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Monday, 12 March 2012

choosing a photographar or camera man

Do not overlook the importance of selecting the right photographer  or cameraman. It's important to remember that the photographer you choose will be responsible for capturing the moments and memories of what may be the most important for the feature film or any kind or movie you working for. With this in mind, you'll want to take great care in selecting a photographer/cameraman  considering there are no second chances. because acting as well as weather and time will not give you second chance to shoot for the scenes you like or called best shots.

As you might imagine, movie photography is one of the most challenging types of professional photography. The photographer/cameraman has to make everyone look beautiful, shooting in a multitude of locations in all kinds of weather conditions--and accomplish all this in minimum amount of time. At the same time, your photographer should have the personality to complement you on your most hardest day. Take your time and follow some of the simple suggestions discussed below, and you will most certainly be satisfied with the outcome.

Where Do You Begin?

Personal referrals or asking friends, relatives and co-workers for suggestions, is a great place to start. Typically, people who have had positive experiences with movie makers are more than willing to share that information. In addition, you'll already have some insight about the camera man's personality before you actually meet. After compiling a preliminary list, visit each camera man's web site and thoughtfully review his or her online portfolio. If a portfolio looks appealing you, chances are, that photographer/camera man might be a good fit. Next, call or email each photographer on your list. Through this initial contact, you can determine the photographer's availability, the type of work they specialize in (candid or traditional) as well as an estimate of the cost and what you'll receive for that fee.

Schedule appointments with the photographers who seem most appropriate and ask to view their portfolios in person and discuss more details. Ask each of them to show you a complete portfolio of any events --this will give you a much clearer sense of what you can expect than a collection of choice shots or footage  from several different events. Pay attention to whether the photographer is adept at portraying individual expressions and personalities as well as understand the scene - sequence and frames included into the movie 

What Questions Should You Ask?

Be sure to write down all of your questions beforehand, and take thorough notes during the meetings. Although most professional photographers/cameraman  will provide you with a clear outline of their services and fees prior to your meeting, you will, in all likelihood, still have a large number of questions to ask. Remember, the more information you have, the more confident and relaxed you'll feel on your work

The following are some questions, courtesy of, you may wish to consider asking:

•How will you show me pictures for selection (e.g., electronic, proofs, contact sheets, online gallery, etc.)?
•Will you help me choose the final pictures?

•What are the costs of the various levels of coverage?
•Are there different degrees of coverage?
•What is your photography style; photojournalistic, traditional, mixed, etc.?
•What's your time frame for preparing the pictures for my selection?
•How long do I have to make up my mind as to which pictures I want and how many?
•How long have you been in business?
•What kind of guarantee comes with my hiring you?
•What's your philosophy for photographing ?
•Will you have an assistant?
•Do you have travel fees?
•How much is your overtime fee?
•Do you have a backup?
•Will you be shooting personally?
•Will you use film or digital?
•What's your payment policy?
•Do you give any guarantees on your services and photographs?
•What is the possibility of the pictures fading?

How Much Will It Cost?

The following are some points,  that will help prepare you for what you might expect to pay for your job an to allocate a significant portion of your  budget to ensure photographs are perfect. Expect to spend at least  Other extras that may increase your bottom line include additional hours, additional camera man . Add on too many extras – and your photography budget could quickly creep to limit and beyond!

•Cut the extras and turn them as a  package from a skilled cameraman. By paying for the photographer's expertise only, you will ensure great works –

•Enter the digital age with digital photography. It's less costly than film, and with technological advances in equipment – digital images are no longer a sacrifice in quality. Many photographers have taken the digital plunge – which results in savings for you!

•Cut the timeline…the longer your event, the more it will cost to document it. Since photographers often charge based on the number of hours they will spend at your job, a shorter/smaller duration will yield big savings in your photography budget.

Making a Commitment

At this point, you should have a relatively clear idea of which photographer is best suited to capture your . Once you have made a decision, be prepared to leave a deposit to reserve the date. You may still wish to reassure yourself by asking about a few final details. For example, find out what the photographer's policy for date changes is and what the alternatives are if he or she is not available on the backup date. Also, ask about their policy for an unexpected cancellation. If you feel the photographer is right for you, then relax and make the commitment with the confidence that you've made a well-formed, intelligent decision in planning the most important day of your life.

Pittsburgh the first movie theatre

When it is initially produced, a feature film is often shown to audiences in a movie theater or cinema. The first theater designed exclusively for cinema opened in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1905. Thousands of such theaters were built or converted from existing facilities within a few years. In the United States, these theaters came to be known as nickelodeons, because admission typically cost a nickel (five cents).

Typically, one film is the featured presentation (or feature film). Before the 1970s, there were "double features"; typically, a high quality "A picture" rented by an independent theater for a lump sum, and a "B picture" of lower quality rented for a percentage of the gross receipts. Today, the bulk of the material shown before the feature film consists of previews for upcoming movies and paid advertisements (also known as trailers or "The Twenty").

Historically, all mass marketed feature films were made to be shown in movie theaters. The development of television has allowed films to be broadcast to larger audiences, usually after the film is no longer being shown in theaters. Recording technology has also enabled consumers to rent or buy copies of films on VHS or DVD (and the older formats of laserdisc, VCD and SelectaVision - see also videodisc), and Internet downloads may be available and have started to become revenue sources for the film companies. Some films are now made specifically for these other venues, being released as made-for-TV movies or direct-to-video movies. The production values on these films are often considered to be of inferior quality compared to theatrical releases in similar genres, and indeed, some films that are rejected by their own studios upon completion are distributed

The movie theater pays an average of about 50-55% of its ticket sales to the movie studio, as film rental fees. The actual percentage starts with a number higher than that, and decreases as the duration of a film's showing continues, as an incentive to theaters to keep movies in the theater longer. However, today's barrage of highly marketed movies ensures that most movies are shown in first-run theaters for less than 8 weeks. There are a few movies every year that defy this rule, often limited-release movies that start in only a few theaters and actually grow their theater count through good word-of-mouth and reviews. According to a 2000 study by ABN AMRO, about 26% of Hollywood movie studios' worldwide income came from box office ticket sales; 46% came from VHS and DVD sales to consumers; and 28% came from television (broadcast, cable, and pay-per-view).

Thursday, 8 March 2012

How To Build A Funny Videos Website

Early on, there were only comic books and video tapes that people brooded over to have a good laugh, but today there are so many websites available for the same. These websites are filled with funny crazy pictures, funny video clips and allow the user to surf through and watch any video they wish to. They can either watch the top rated ones or specify a search keyword and look for that one particular video. However, building a funny video website is not as easy as it seems. If an individual wants to create a website, they need to go through a rigorous process. And so, you can imagine the amount of details involved for a company to launch a website. Their main content would be based on humor and interactive flash games only.

Once a company decided to get into the funny video website category, they will need to assess the other websites already existing in the market and what they can offer that isn't already there. As they discuss these issues with their team, they will also have to touch base with a good web hosting company to figure out if they can use their domain for the upcoming website. A funny videos website consumes a lot of bandwidth, so a dedicated server is usually required for hosting. The one thing to keep in mind is that every step of the way takes a lot of effort, so one must have a clear cut budget before delving into this pool.

A website needs bright appealing colors, simple easy to use layout and most importantly content that will catch the eye of the person browsing through the site. If they find it interesting, they will stop and spend couple of more minutes, else will move on to other websites. A good PHP or ASP programmer can do the customized coding and put in all the necessary links, but it is difficult to find someone who will understand your needs and create a site that satisfies your dreams. The funny images and videos that you put in your site should be unique and be humorous. Some also have the html code for the video to be embedded in other websites, like MySpace or Blogs. This will help your site stand out among the crowd and get people to notice it. Finding interested people to contribute to the funny crazy pictures, flash animation videos will take time for a start up venture.

Will there be categories to sort the videos into? For example, if a person wants to upload videos about his dogs, will your sites have a category labeled "Dog Videos"? This will come in handy when a new visitor is looking for funny videos related to dogs. This makes it easier for them to navigate through your site and find what interests them, making them stick around longer to browse the other features on your site.

Some of the crazy pictures and funny video clips on other sites have the option for the viewer to rate the video, and post a comment. These are added features that allow the user to feel important making them come back to the site. The company should therefore think through their plan and get their facts together before putting their site out to the public. And if it is not interesting, or the pictures aren't funny enough, you will have lost a prospective member. It is therefore advisable for the company to spend time in doing their research to try and come up with an idea to outdo the other funny video websites.